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Migrating from 0.x

First of all if you still have tauri as dependency in your package.json replace it with a recent version of @tauri-apps/cli (make sure to also change the import path in your JavaScript/TypeScript files, see JavaScript).

For example:

- "tauri": "^0.14.1"
+ "@tauri-apps/cli": "^1.0.0-beta.0"

Next update your Cargo.toml:

  • add tauri-build as a new build-dependency and remove winres, e.g.:

    + [build-dependencies]
    + tauri-build = { version = "1.0.0-beta.0" }
    
    - [target."cfg(windows)".build-dependencies]
    - winres = "0.1"
  • update the version of tauri to e.g. 1.0.0-beta.0

  • remove all old features of the tauri dependency

  • remove all features, that tauri added and add custom-protocol as a new one:

    [features]
    - embedded-server = [ "tauri/embedded-server" ]
    - no-server = [ "tauri/no-server" ]
    + custom-protocol = [ "tauri/custom-protocol" ]
    + default = [ "custom-protocol" ]

Update your tauri.conf.json like this:

  • remove ctx
  • remove the embeddedServer
  • rename osx to macOS and add some fields:
    • "exceptionDomain": ""
    • "signingIdentity": null
    • "entitlements": null
  • remove the exceptionDomain
  • add a configuration for windows:
    • "certificateThumbprint": null
    • "digestAlgorithm": "sha256"
    • "timestampUrl": ""
  • make the window definition into an array and call it windows
  • remove inliner

for more information about the config see here

  {
-   "ctx": {},
    "tauri": {
-     "embeddedServer": {
-       "active": true
-     },
      "bundle": {
-       "osx": {
+       "macOS": {
          "frameworks": [],
          "minimumSystemVersion": "",
-         "useBootstrapper": false
+         "useBootstrapper": false,
+         "exceptionDomain": "",
+         "signingIdentity": null,
+         "entitlements": null
        },
-       "exceptionDomain": ""
+       "windows": {
+         "certificateThumbprint": null,
+         "digestAlgorithm": "sha256",
+         "timestampUrl": ""
+       }
      },
+     "updater": {
+       "active": false
+     },
-     "window": {
+     "windows": [
        {
          "title": "Tauri App",
          "width": 800,
          "height": 600,
          "resizable": true,
          "fullscreen": false
        }
+     ],
-     "inliner": {
-       "active": true
-     }
    }
  }

Commands#

The following example is taken from the previous documentation.

In the new version of Tauri there is no distinction between synchronous and asynchronous commands, the only difference in your code is a call of tauri::execute_promise(), that isn't there in a synchronous command.

Rust#

Here is the complete example code of the "old" version:

use serde::{Deserialize, Serialize};

#[derive(Deserialize)]
struct DoSomethingPayload {
  state: String,
  data: u64,
}

#[derive(Deserialize)]
#[serde(tag = "cmd", rename_all = "camelCase")]
enum Cmd {
  DoSomething {
    count: u64,
    payload: DoSomethingPayload,
    callback: String,
    error: String,
  },
}

#[derive(Serialize)]
struct Response<'a> {
  value: u64,
  message: &'a str,
}

#[derive(Debug, Clone)]
struct CommandError<'a> {
  message: &'a str,
}

impl<'a> CommandError<'a> {
  fn new(message: &'a str) -> Self {
    Self { message }
  }
}

impl<'a> std::fmt::Display for CommandError<'a> {
  fn fmt(&self, f: &mut std::fmt::Formatter<'_>) -> std::fmt::Result {
    write!(f, "{}", self.message)
  }
}

impl<'a> std::error::Error for CommandError<'a> {}

fn main() {
  tauri::AppBuilder::new()
    .invoke_handler(|_webview, arg| {
      use Cmd::*;
      match serde_json::from_str(arg) {
        Err(e) => Err(e.to_string()),
        Ok(command) => {
          match command {
            DoSomething { count, payload, callback, error } => tauri::execute_promise(
              _webview,
              move || {
                if count > 5 {
                  let response = Response {
                    value: 5,
                    message: "async response!",
                  };
                  Ok(response)
                } else {
                  Err(CommandError::new("count should be > 5").into())
                }
              },
              callback,
              error,
            ),
          }
          Ok(())
        }
      }
    })
    .build()
    .run();
}

Complete the following steps to migrate your code:

  • create a new function for every Cmd enum variant
  • wrap the new function with the #[tauri::command] macro
  • use the fields of the enum as arguments (callback and error can be deleted)
  • as function body use the code inside the match block of the enum variant
  • add a return type
  • rename AppBuilder to Builder in main()
  • replace the big invoke_handler with the new syntax

The old example code should look like this now:

use serde::{Deserialize, Serialize};

#[derive(Deserialize)]
struct DoSomethingPayload {
  state: String,
  data: u64,
}

#[derive(Serialize)]
struct Response<'a> {
  value: u64,
  message: &'a str,
}

#[derive(Debug, Clone, Serialize)]
struct CommandError<'a> {
  message: &'a str,
}

impl<'a> CommandError<'a> {
  fn new(message: &'a str) -> Self {
    Self { message }
  }
}

impl<'a> std::fmt::Display for CommandError<'a> {
  fn fmt(&self, f: &mut std::fmt::Formatter<'_>) -> std::fmt::Result {
    write!(f, "{}", self.message)
  }
}

impl<'a> std::error::Error for CommandError<'a> {}

#[tauri::command]
fn do_something(count: u64, payload: DoSomethingPayload) -> Result<Response, CommandError> {
  if count > 5 {
    let response = Response {
      value: 5,
      message: "async response!",
    };
    Ok(response)
  } else {
    Err(CommandError::new("count should be > 5").into())
  }
}

fn main() {
  tauri::Builder::new()
    .invoke_handler(tauri::generate_handler![do_something])
    .run(tauri::generate_context!());
}

JavaScript#

Like mentioned above there is also no distinction between synchronous and asynchronous commands in JavaScript.
You only have to use invoke and optionally use the results.

Here is an example of the "old" code:

invoke({
  cmd: 'doSomething',
  count: 5,
  payload: {
    state: 'some string data',
    data: 17
  }
});

promisified({
  cmd: 'doSomething',
  count: 5,
  payload: {
    state: 'some string data',
    data: 17
  }
}).then(response => {
  console.log(response);
}).catch(error => {
  console.error(error);
});

Complete the following steps to migrate your code:

  • replace all promisified-calls with invoke-calls

  • extract the cmd attribute of the argument object as first parameter
    (you may have to rename it to snake_case as the cmd parameter is now the name of the function in Rust)

  • if you import parts of the tauri-api with tauri/api/* replace it with @tauri-apps/api/*, e.g.:

    - import { invoke } from 'tauri/api/tauri';
    + import { invoke } from '@tauri-apps/api/tauri';

The old example code should look like this now:

invoke(
  'do_something',
  {
    count: 5,
    payload: {
      state: 'some string data',
      data: 17
    }
  }
);

invoke(
  'do_something',
  {
    count: 5,
    payload: {
      state: 'some string data',
      data: 17
    }
  }
).then(response => {
  console.log(response);
}).catch(error => {
  console.error(error);
});

For more information on commands read Create Rust Commands.